The world's most democratic encyclopedia in theory falls rather short of that in practice, as the case of Rupert's Wikipedia page abundantly illustrates. It's been a battleground for years, where Guerrilla skeptics and other dogmatic activists dominate the content, preventing others from changing the text, even to correct errors, by automatically reversing their edits, banning people who continue to try, and other unsavory tactics.

Rupert's is one of many pages they've taken over. In Wikipedia Under Threat Rupert describes the broader problem in depth. He spoke on the topic at Hollyhock and on BBC World Update. Author Craig Weiler was inspired enough to write a book about the problem, and Rome Viharo produced an extensive case study documenting the edit war from the trenches, finally discovering the identities of some of the annonymous guerrilla skeptics causing so much grief.

All this and more below.

Audios

Essays by Rupert

Wikipedia Under Threat

Wikipedia is a wonderful invention. But precisely because it's so trusted and convenient, people with their own agendas keep trying to take it over. Editing wars are common. According to researchers at Oxford University, the most controversial subjects worldwide include Israel and God.

A Case Study on Editing Rupert's Wikipedia Page

Wikipedia We Have a Problem

by Rome Viharo.

A Book on the TED and Wikipedia Controversies

Psi Wars: TED, Wikipedia and the Battle for the Internet

by Craig Weiler

"First rate exposé of an Orwellian reality in plain sight."
– Dean Radin

Craig also blogged about the wikipedia battle for Rupert Sheldrake's biography.

More...

The "Talk" page for Rupert's Wikipedia Entry

Here you can read the detailed history of exchanges between skeptics and those seeking a more neutral viewpoint yourself.

Topics That Spark Wikipedia 'Edit Wars' Revealed

BBC News, 18 July 2013

What Guerrilla Skeptics Say About Their Efforts

Guerrilla Skepticism on Wikipedia

Guerrilla Skepticism training video